scholarly communication

Labor and Reward in Science: Do Women Have an Equal Voice in Scholarly Communication? a Brown Bag with Cassidy Sugimoto

Sep 25, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-401

Despite progress, gender disparities in science persist. Women remain underrepresented in the scientific workforce and under rewarded for their contributions. This talk will examine multiple layers of gender disparities in science, triangulating data from scientometrics, surveys, and social media to provide a broader perspective on the gendered nature of scientific communication. The extent of gender disparities and the ways in which new media are changing these patterns will be discussed.

2016 Canada ORCID Workshop

May 17, 8:30am to 5:00pm

Location: 

Toronto, CA

Dr Altman will moderate group discussions at the 2016 Canada ORCID Workshop

The theme of the meeting is "ORCID and the Research Lifecycle", with talks on ORCID APIs, research information interoperability, and ORCID at scale, and panel conversations on ORCID in research workflows and platform integrations.

Brown Bag: Towards an Open Science Publishing Platform - with Vitek Tracz

Feb 23, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-117

The traditional way of publishing new findings in journals is becoming increasingly outdated and no longer serves the needs of much of science.  Vitek will discuss a new approach being developed by F1000, an Open Science Platform, that combines immediate publication (like a preprint) with formal, invited, and transparent post-publication peer review.

IAP- Confidential Research Information Management: Security and Privacy Key Concepts

Jan 11, 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

E25-401, MIT Cambridge

This tutorial provides a framework for identifying and managing confidential information in research. It is most appropriate for mid-late career graduate students, faculty, and professional research staff who actively engage in the design/planning of research. The course will provide an overview of the major legal requirements governing confidential research data; and the core technological measures used to safeguard data. And it will provide an introduction to the statistical methods and software tools used to analyze and limit disclosure risks.

 

IAP- Scholarly Reputation Management for Early Career Researchers

Jan 25, 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

E25-111

In the rapidly changing world of research and scholarly communications researchers are faced with a rapidly growing range of options to publicly disseminate, review, and discuss researchoptions which will affect their long-term reputation. Early career scholars must be especially thoughtful in choosing how much effort to invest in dissemination and communication, and what strategies to use. 

 

IAP- Scholarly Reputation Management for Early Career Researchers

Nov 02, 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

E25-202

In the rapidly changing world of research and scholarly communications researchers are faced with a rapidly growing range of options to publicly disseminate, review, and discuss researchoptions which will affect their long-term reputation. Early career scholars must be especially thoughtful in choosing how much effort to invest in dissemination and communication, and what strategies to use. 

 

Brown Bag Talk with Micah Altman Integrating Open Data into Open Access Journals

Oct 20, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-401

This talk discusses findings from an analysis of data sharing and citation policies in Open Access journals and describes a set of novel tools for open data publication in open access journal workflows.  Bring your lunch and enjoy a discussion fit for scholars, Open Access fans, and students alike.

 

Altman M, Avery M.
Information wants someone else to pay for it: laws of information economics and scholarly publishing
. Information Services and Use [Internet]. 2015;35(1-2):57-70.
Abstract: The increasing volume and complexity of research, scholarly publication and research information puts an added strain on traditional methods of scholarly communication and evaluation. Information goods and networks are not standard market goods – and so we should not rely on markets alone to develop  new forms of scholarly publishing. The affordances of digital information and networks create many opportunities to unbundle the functions of scholarly communication – the central challenge is to create a range of new forms of publication that effectively promote both market and collaborative ecosystems.  
Brand A, Allen L, Altman M, Hlava M, Scott J.

Beyond authorship: attribution, contribution, collaboration, and credit

. Learned Publishing [Internet]. 2015;28(2):151-155. Publisher's VersionAbstract
As the number of authors on scientific publications increases, ordered lists of author names are proving inadequate for the purposes of attribution and credit. • A multi-stakeholder group has produced a contributor role taxonomy for use in scientific publications. • Identifying specific contributions to published research will lead to appropriate credit, fewer author disputes, and fewer disincentives to collaboration and the sharing of data and code