Inclusive Design

Inclusive, accessible design -- including makerspaces, and virtual reality

Creative Data Literacy: Commentary on Catherine D’Ignazio’s Program on Information Science Talk

Catherine D’Ignazio is an Assistant Professor of Civic Media and Data Visualization at Emerson College, a principal investigator at the Engagement Lab, and a research affiliate at the MIT Media Lab/Center for Civic Media. She presented this talk, entitled, Creative Data Literacy: Bridging the Gap Between Data-Haves and Have-Nots as part of Program on Information Science Brown Bag Series.

Becoming a Practitioner Scholar in Technology for Development (And Involving students!): Commentary on Laura Hosman’s Talk

Professor Laura Hosman, who is Assistant Professor at Arizona State University (with a joint appointment in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and in The Polytechnic School) gave this talk Becoming a Practitioner Scholar in Technology for Development as part of the Program on Information Science Brown Bag Series.

Reality Bytes - Utilizing VR and AR in the Library Space- a Brownbag with Matt Bernhardt

Jun 21, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-401 also via WebEx +1-617-324-0000 Access code:648 311 173

Terms like "virtual reality" and "augmented reality" have existed for a long time. In recent years, thanks to products like Google Cardboard and games like Pokemon Go, an increasing number of people have gained first-hand experience with these once-exotic technologies. The MIT Libraries are no exception to this trend. The Program on Information Science has conducted enough experimentation that we would like to share what we have learned, and solicit ideas for further investigation.

Altman M, Bernhardt M, Horowitz L, Lu W, Shapiro R. Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services (SPEC KIT 348). Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries; 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
 Rapid fabrication technologies, or “3-D Printing,” to use the less accurate but more familiar term, have undergone rapid evolution and are now used for medical implants, prosthetics, teaching aids, information visualization, research on rare/fragile objects, architecture, art, and advanced manufacturing. These technologies are rapidly lowering a number of different barriers faced by researchers and others, barriers that had previously made it prohibitively difficult for most individuals, researchers, and organizations to manufacture objects without significant investment of  time and money in training and equipment. Because of these advances, the complexity and range of objects that may now be manufactured has increased precipitously, including easily customized items or precisely replicated physical objects, while the process by which these may be manufactured has flattened,  allowing on-site or local manufacture and reducing lead time (in some cases permitting even just-in-time manufacturing processes). Our analysis provides  information for senior library staff to support decisions related to engagement with 3-D printing, rapid fabrication and digitization technologies, and makerspaces, in general, and in particular to inform decisions regarding the types of service offerings libraries can provide, resources needed, and evaluation of the service.

IAPRIL: 3D PRINTING FOR FUN AND SCIENCE? A CONVERSATION ABOUT DIGITAL FABRICATION, THE LIBRARY, AND YOU

Apr 14, 3:00pm to 4:30pm

Digital fabrication has changed considerably over the last few decades. Barriers to use have fallen, and technologies that were once the purview of specialized researchers are now sold in retail outlets like Sears, Staples and the Microsoft store. Schools and libraries have even begun getting into the act, from NC State to the Chicago Public Library.