Digital Libraries

Becoming a Practitioner Scholar in Technology for Development (And Involving students!): Commentary on Laura Hosman’s Talk

Professor Laura Hosman, who is Assistant Professor at Arizona State University (with a joint appointment in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and in The Polytechnic School) gave this talk Becoming a Practitioner Scholar in Technology for Development as part of the Program on Information Science Brown Bag Series.

Reality Bytes - Utilizing VR and AR in the Library Space- a Brownbag with Matt Bernhardt

Jun 21, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-401 also via WebEx +1-617-324-0000 Access code:648 311 173

Terms like "virtual reality" and "augmented reality" have existed for a long time. In recent years, thanks to products like Google Cardboard and games like Pokemon Go, an increasing number of people have gained first-hand experience with these once-exotic technologies. The MIT Libraries are no exception to this trend. The Program on Information Science has conducted enough experimentation that we would like to share what we have learned, and solicit ideas for further investigation.

Brown Bag: Issues in Curating the Open Web at Scale - with Gary Price

Sep 20, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

E25-401

Much of the web remains invisible: resources are undescribed, unindexed or simply buried --  as many people rarely look past the first page of Google searches or are unavailable from traditional library resources.

At the same time many traditional library databases pay little attention to quality content from credible sources accessible on the open web.

How do we build collections of quality open-web resources (i.e. documents, specialty databases, and multimedia) and make them accessible to individuals and user groups when and where they need it?

Altman M, Bernhardt M, Horowitz L, Lu W, Shapiro R. Rapid Fabrication/Makerspace Services (SPEC KIT 348). Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries; 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
 Rapid fabrication technologies, or “3-D Printing,” to use the less accurate but more familiar term, have undergone rapid evolution and are now used for medical implants, prosthetics, teaching aids, information visualization, research on rare/fragile objects, architecture, art, and advanced manufacturing. These technologies are rapidly lowering a number of different barriers faced by researchers and others, barriers that had previously made it prohibitively difficult for most individuals, researchers, and organizations to manufacture objects without significant investment of  time and money in training and equipment. Because of these advances, the complexity and range of objects that may now be manufactured has increased precipitously, including easily customized items or precisely replicated physical objects, while the process by which these may be manufactured has flattened,  allowing on-site or local manufacture and reducing lead time (in some cases permitting even just-in-time manufacturing processes). Our analysis provides  information for senior library staff to support decisions related to engagement with 3-D printing, rapid fabrication and digitization technologies, and makerspaces, in general, and in particular to inform decisions regarding the types of service offerings libraries can provide, resources needed, and evaluation of the service.

IAPRIL: 3D PRINTING FOR FUN AND SCIENCE? A CONVERSATION ABOUT DIGITAL FABRICATION, THE LIBRARY, AND YOU

Apr 14, 3:00pm to 4:30pm

Digital fabrication has changed considerably over the last few decades. Barriers to use have fallen, and technologies that were once the purview of specialized researchers are now sold in retail outlets like Sears, Staples and the Microsoft store. Schools and libraries have even begun getting into the act, from NC State to the Chicago Public Library.

Altman M, Borgman C, Crosas M, Martone M.

 

An Introduction to the Joint Principles for Data Citation

. Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology [Internet]. 2015;41(3):43-44. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Data citation is rapidly emerging as a key practice supporting data access, sharing and reuse, as well as sound and reproducible scholarship. Consensus data citation principles, articulated through the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles [3], represent an advance in the state of the practice and a new consensus on citation

Brown Bag Lunch: New Discovery Tools for Digital Humanities and Spatial Data, Lex Berman, Harvard University

Jul 16, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

The library catalog has evolved from the description of items in physical collections into a wide-reaching net of services and tools for managing both physical collections and networked resources.  The line between descriptive metadata and actual content is becoming blurred.   Librarians and catalogers are now in the position of being not only docents of collections, but innovators in digital research, and this opens up a number of opportunities for retooling library discovery tools.   This presentation will present a survey of methods and projects that have extended traditional catalogs …

Libraries and Research: Supporting Change/Changing Support

Jun 10, 9:00am to 5:00pm

Dr Altman will present a briefing at the OCLC Research Library Partnership Meeting , in Amsterdam, on the topic of researcher identifiers

Scholarly output is a major factor in the reputation and ranking of individuals, publications and institutions. It is often requires substantial manual effort, however, to reliably link common research outputs, such as journal articles, to the individuals that produce them.

Altman M, Crosas M. The Evolution of Data Citation: From Principles to Implementation. IASSIST Quarterly. 2014.Abstract
Data citation is rapidly emerging as a key practice in support of data access, sharing, reuse, and of sound and reproducible scholarship. In this article we review the evolution of data citation standards and practices – to which Sue Dodd was an early contributor – and the core principles of data citation that have emerged through a collaborative synthesis. We then discuss an example of the current state of the practice, and identify the remaining implementation challenges.

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