Guest Post: Diana Hellyar on Library Use of New Visualization Technologies

Diana Hellyar  who is a Graduate Research Intern in the program, reflects on her investigations into augmented reality, virtual reality, and related technologies

Libraries Can Use New Visualization Technology to Engage Readers

My research as a Research Intern for the MIT Libraries Program on Information Science is focused on the applications of emerging virtual reality and visualization technology to library information discovery. The area of virtual reality and other visualization technology is a rapidly changing field. Staying on top of these technologies and applying them into libraries can be difficult since there is little research on the topic. While I was researching the uses of virtual reality in libraries, I came across an example of how some libraries were able to incorporate augmented reality into their children’s department. Out of a dozen examples, this one caught my attention for many reasons. This example is not just a prototype; it was being used in multiple libraries. It was also easily adopted by non-technical librarians and was easy enough to be used by children.

The mythical maze app (available here) has been downloaded more than 10,000 times to date. Across the United Kingdom children participated in the Reading Agency’s 2014 Summer Reading Challenge, Mythical Maze, by downloading the Mythical Maze app on their mobile devices. Liz McGettigan discusses the app in an article published on the Charter Institute of Library and Information Professions website by explaining how it uses augmented reality to make posters and legend cards around the library come to life. The article links to The Reading Agency’s promotional video (watch it here). The video discusses how mythical creatures are hidden around the library and how children can look for these mythical creatures with their app. If they find the creatures, they can use the app to unlock mini-games. The app also allows children to scan stickers they receive from reading books, which unlocks rewards and allows children to learn more about the mythical creatures.

Using apps and integrating augmented reality is a fun way to do a summer reading challenge. The Reading Agency reported that 2014 was record-breaking year for their program. They state that participation increased by 3.6% and that 81,908 children joined the library to participate in the program, up 22.7% from the previous year. These statistics show that children are responding positively to augmented reality in their libraries.

I think that the best part about this app is that it allows the children’s room to come alive. Children can interact with the library in a way they never have been before.  Encouraging children to use their devices in the library in a fun and educational way is groundbreaking. They may never have been allowed to play with and learn from their devices at the library before.

The article about the summer reading challenge also discussed the idea of “transliteracy”. The author, Liz McGettigan, says that transliteracy is defined as the “ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms and tools”. It’s important to encourage children to learn how to use their devices to find the information they are looking for. Encouraging children to use their devices for the summer reading challenge helps them to learn how to do this.

What can libraries do with this? I think that libraries can learn from this example and not just for a summer reading program. The librarians can create scavenger hunts for kids that are either for fun or to help them learn about the library and its services. Children can collect prizes for the things they find in the library using the app. Librarians can even use it to have kids react to and rate the books they read. An app can be designed so that if a child hovers their device over a book they can see other children’s ratings and comments about the book. They can do any of these things and more to create new excitement for their library.

One way for this to work would be if publishers teamed up with libraries to create content for similar apps. Then, there would be many more possibilities for interactive content without worrying about copyright issues. Libraries could create a small section of books that would be able to interact with the app. Then, with the device hovered over a book, the story comes to life and is read to them.

There are so many possibilities for teaching, learning, and reading  while using augmented reality in children’s departments of libraries. The Mythical Maze summer reading program is hopefully only the beginning in terms of using this technology to engage children. With the success of the summer reading challenge, I hope other libraries will consider including it in their programming. Using this technology will only enhance learning and will create fun new ways to get children excited about reading.

This example illustrates the possibility of using augmented reality to engage in new visualization technologies. Many types of libraries can implement this technology and allow their users to interact with physical materials in a way they never have before.

Additional Resources:

 


See also: drmaltman